A critical review on environmental presence of pharmaceutical drugs tested for the covid-19 treatment

© 2021 Institution of Chemical Engineers. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved..

On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared COVID-19 a pandemic. The outbreak caused a worldwide impact, becoming a health threat to the general population and its professionals. To date, there are no specific antiviral treatments or vaccines for the COVID-19 infection, however, some drugs are being clinically tested. The use of these drugs on large scale raises great concern about their imminent environmental risk, since the elimination of these compounds by feces and urine associated with the inefficiency of sewage treatment plants in their removal can result in their persistence in the environment, putting in risk the health of humans and of other species. Thus, the goal of this work was to conduct a review of other studies that evaluated the presence of the drugs chloroquine, hydroxychloroquine, azithromycin, ivermectin, dexamethasone, remdesivir, favipiravir and some HIV antivirals in the environment. The research indicated the presence of these drugs in the environment in different regions, with concentration data that could serve as a basis for further comparative studies following the pandemic.

Media Type:

Electronic Article

Year of Publication:

2021

Contained In:

Process safety and environmental protection : transactions of the Institution of Chemical Engineers, Part B - Vol. 152 (2021), p. 568-582

Language:

English

Contributors:

Nippes, Ramiro Picoli
Macruz, Paula Derksen
da Silva, Gabriela Nascimento
Neves Olsen Scaliante, Mara Heloisa

Urls:

Volltext

Keywords:

Emerging micropollutants
Environmental pollution
Journal Article
Medicaments
Pandemic
Review
SARS-CoV-2

Notes:

Date Revised 27.07.2021

published: Print-Electronic

Citation Status PubMed-not-MEDLINE

Copyright: From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine

Physical Description:

Online-Ressource

doi:

10.1016/j.psep.2021.06.040

PMID:

34226801

PPN (Catalogue-ID):

NLM328881414