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Ixazomib-based frontline therapy in patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma in real-life practice showed comparable efficacy and safety profile with those reported in clinical trial : a multi-center study

The induction therapy containing ixazomib, an oral proteasome inhibitor, has shown favorable efficacy and safety in clinical trials, but its experience in real-life remains limited. In routine practice, few patients received ixazomib-based induction therapy due to reasons including (1) patients' preference on oral regimens, (2) concerns on adverse events (AEs) of other intravenous/subcutaneous regimens, (3) requirements for less center visits, and (4) fears of COVID-19 and other infectious disease exposures. With the aim of assessing the real-life effectiveness and safety of ixazomib-based induction therapy, we performed this multi-center, observational study on 85 newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (NDMM) patients from 14 medical centers. Ixazomib-based regimens included ixazomib-lenalidomide-dexamethasone (IRd) in 44.7% of patients, ixazomib-dexamethasone (Id) in 29.4%, and Id plus another agent (doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, thalidomide, or daratumumab) in 25.9%. Different ixazomib-based therapies were applied due to (1) financial burdens or limitations on local health insurance coverage, (2) concerns on treatment tolerance, and (3) drug accessibility issue. Ten patients received ixazomib maintenance. The median age was 67 years; 43.5% had ISS stage III disease; 48.2% had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance score ≥ 2; and 17.6% with high-risk cytogenetic abnormalities. Overall response rate for all 85 patients was 95.3%, including 65.9% very good partial response or better and 29.5% complete responses. The median time to response was 30 days. The response rate was similar across different ixazomib-based regimens. Median progression-free survival was not reached. Severe AEs (≥ grade 3) were reported in 29.4% of patients. No grade 3/4 peripheral neuropathy (PN) occurred. Patients received a median of 6 (range 1-20) cycles of ixazomib treatment; 56.6% remained on treatment at data cutoff; 15.3% discontinued treatment due to intolerable AEs. These result... Full description

Year of Publication: 2020
Contained in: Annals of hematology Vol. 99, No. 11 (2020), p. 2589-2598
All journal articles: Search for all articles in this journal
Language: English
Contributors: Li, Jing | Author
Bao, Li
Xia, Zhongjun
Wang, Sili
Zhou, Xin
Ding, Kaiyang
Zhang, Wenhao
Yang, Wei
Li, Bingzong
Fu, Chengcheng
Chen, Bing
Hua, Luoming
Wang, Liang
Luo, Jun
Yang, Yang
Xu, Tianhong
Wang, Weida
Huang, Yun
Wu, Guolin
Liu, Peng
Full text access:
Electronic availability is being checked...
Links: Full Text (dx.doi.org)
Keywords: 4Z63YK6E0E
4Z8R6ORS6L
71050168A2
7S5I7G3JQL
80168379AG
8N3DW7272P
Clinical Trial, Phase I
Clinical Trial, Phase II
F0P408N6V4
Frontline
Ixazomib
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Myeloma
Observational Study
Real-world
TE7660XO1C
daratumumab
ixazomib
Additional Keywords: Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Antibodies, Monoclonal
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols
Boron Compounds
Cyclophosphamide
Dexamethasone
Doxorubicin
Drug Administration Schedule
Female
Glycine
Humans
Lenalidomide
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Myeloma
Neoplasm Staging
Peripheral Nervous System Diseases
Remission Induction
Survival Analysis
Thalidomide
Treatment Outcome
ISSN: 1432-0584
Note: Copyright: From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine
Notes: Date Completed 13.10.2020
Date Revised 13.10.2020
published: Print-Electronic
Citation Status MEDLINE
Copyright: From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine
PMID:
    32892275
Physical Description: Online-Ressource
ID (e.g. DOI, URN): 10.1007/s00277-020-04234-9
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