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Review article : prevention, diagnosis and management of COVID-19 in the IBD patient

© 2020 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

BACKGROUND: The current COVID-19 pandemic, caused by SARS-CoV-2, has emerged as a public health emergency. All nations are seriously challenged as the virus spreads rapidly across the globe with no regard for borders. The primary management of IBD involves treating uncontrolled inflammation with most patients requiring immune-based therapies. However, these therapies may weaken the immune system and potentially place IBD patients at increased risk of infections and infectious complications including those from COVID-19

AIM: To summarise the scale of the COVID-19 pandemic, review unique concerns regarding IBD management and infection risk during the pandemic and assess COVID-19 management options and drug interactions in the IBD population

METHODS: A literature review on IBD, SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19 was undertaken and relevant literature was summarised and critically examined

RESULTS: IBD patients do not appear to be more susceptible to SARS-CoV-2 infection and there is no evidence of an association between IBD therapies and increased risk of COVID-19. IBD medication adherence should be encouraged to prevent disease flare but where possible high-dose systemic corticosteroids should be avoided. Patients should exercise social distancing, optimise co-morbidities and be up to date with influenza and pneumococcal vaccines. If a patient develops COVID-19, immune suppressing medications should be withheld until infection resolution and if trial medications for COVID-19 are being considered, potential drug interactions should be checked

CONCLUSIONS: IBD patient management presents a challenge in the current COVID-19 pandemic. The primary focus should remain on keeping bowel inflammation controlled and encouraging medication adherence

Comment in: Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2020 Jun;51(12):1434-1437. - PMID 32311755
Year of Publication: 2020
Contained in: Alimentary pharmacology & therapeutics Vol. 52, No. 1 (2020), p. 54-72
All journal articles: Search for all articles in this journal
Language: English
Contributors: Al-Ani, Aysha H | Author
Prentice, Ralley E
Rentsch, Clarissa A
Johnson, Doug
Ardalan, Zaid
Heerasing, Neel
Garg, Mayur
Campbell, Sian
Sasadeusz, Joe
Macrae, Finlay A
Ng, Siew C
Rubin, David T
Christensen, Britt
Full text access:
Electronic availability is being checked...
Links: Full Text (dx.doi.org)
Keywords: Journal Article
Review
Additional Keywords: Betacoronavirus
Comorbidity
Coronavirus Infections
Humans
Inflammation
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
Pandemics
Pneumonia, Viral
ISSN: 1365-2036
Note: Copyright: From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine
Notes: Date Completed 22.06.2020
Date Revised 22.06.2020
published: Print-Electronic
CommentIn: Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2020 Jun;51(12):1434-1437. - PMID 32311755
Citation Status MEDLINE
Copyright: From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine
PMID:
    32348598
Physical Description: Online-Ressource
ID (e.g. DOI, URN): 10.1111/apt.15779
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520 |a RESULTS: IBD patients do not appear to be more susceptible to SARS-CoV-2 infection and there is no evidence of an association between IBD therapies and increased risk of COVID-19. IBD medication adherence should be encouraged to prevent disease flare but where possible high-dose systemic corticosteroids should be avoided. Patients should exercise social distancing, optimise co-morbidities and be up to date with influenza and pneumococcal vaccines. If a patient develops COVID-19, immune suppressing medications should be withheld until infection resolution and if trial medications for COVID-19 are being considered, potential drug interactions should be checked 
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